why do bike hubs make noise

Bike noise is a common issue for cyclists. While there are many potential causes of hub noise, fortunately there are also several ways to address the problem.

Bicycles are subject to several sources for vibrations and associated noise. These include the drive train, particularly the chain, as well as tire road interactions. In addition to these sources, there is also usually some level of noise made by the bearings used in bicycles. This article will cover the whole topic that “Why do bike hubs make noise”?

Bicycle hubs can be divided into two categories: front hubs which contain the front sprocket and rear hubs which contain the rear freewheel sprocket and bearings. The usual source of hub bearing noise is from a condition known as “bearing knock.” This condition involves a knocking sound emanating from one or more of the bicycle’s hubs during pedalling action – usually at higher cadences.

There are several possible causes of bearing knock. One cause can be contamination of the bearings with water, dust, or dirt. This can lead to the development of rust which will create increased drag on the bearings, thus causing them to heat up and produce noise.

Another common cause of bearing knock is incorrect adjustment of the hub bearings. This can often be attributed to over-tightening or under-tightening of the axle nuts. When this occurs, it places undue stress on the bearings and eventually leads to failure.

A third potential cause of bearing knock is damage to the bearing races or balls. This can be caused by several factors such as impact from a foreign object, excessive wear, or chemical attack. When a bicycle bearing begins to fail, it will often produce a high frequency sound as it is spinning or will even “freeze.” For those bicyclists who have had their bicycle for a few years and have maintained the moving parts properly, you may never know that your bearings are failing. The first indication of this is usually when one or more pieces from the hub fall out onto the ground beneath your bike.

How to reduce the hub noise in bike

When you buy a commercial hub, it is well-greased, and all the parts are good. But after only a couple of kilometres the sound changes to a not very pleasant one. The reason is that metal particles get into the grease and start scratching each other inside the hub shell.

You can either reduce this noise by yourself or ask your local service shop to do it for you. There are 2 possible solutions.

Cleaning bearings:

You will need a cone wrench (size 30 or 32 depending on your model), some washing liquid, great gloves, and rags. First, you must get rid of oil from bearings, fill them with washing liquid and forget about them for 1 hour while you wash bearing cup with washing liquid, too. Wipe everything with rags and repeat everything again using only water. When it’s finished, dry everything as good as you can (if you don’t wait for bearings to be completely dried out they will rust). Now, oil the bearings with proper oils (do not use “Heavy Duty” one!), fill them with grease and finally rub axle ends against each other before inserting nuts.

Greasing:

You will need a cone wrench (size 30 or 32 depending on your model), some washing liquid and great gloves. First, you must get rid of old grease from bearing cup, fill it with washing liquid and forget about it for 1 hour while you wash bearing cup with washing liquid, too. Wipe everything with rags and repeat everything again using only water. When it’s finished, dry everything as good as you can. Now, oil the bearings with proper oils (do not use “Heavy Duty” one!), fill them with grease and finally rub axle ends against each other before inserting nuts.

We will also talk about some important things to consider before we start this process so that we can improve the effectiveness of our work and reduce the time it takes to complete these steps. We’ll start with a little background information on noise so that we know what causes hub noise and how it typically manifests itself in bicycles. Once we have a basic understanding of this issue, then we’ll share some tips for pre-work planning as well as go over two ways that cyclists can address the common source of the problem by themselves at home or in their shop.

If you’re not sure how to do this, take your bike to a service shop and ask them to do it for you. It will cost you some money, but it will be worth it because your bike will run smoothly and quietly.

What are the types of Bike hubs

There are three types of bike hubs: front, rear, and centre.

Front hubs are in the front wheel and attach to the axle. They are typically smaller than rear hubs and have fewer parts. This makes them easier to maintain and repair.

Rear hubs are in the rear wheel and attach to the axle. They are typically larger than front hubs and have more parts. This makes them more difficult to maintain and repair.

Centre hubs are in the centre of the bike frame and attach to the axle. They are typically larger than front or rear hubs and have more parts. This makes them more difficult to maintain and repair.

Each type of hub has its own advantages and disadvantages. It is important to match the right hub to the rider’s needs.